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Home > The Intrepid Experience > Past Exhibitions
27 Seconds: The Apollo I Tragedy
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Seperator
27 Seconds: The Apollo I Tragedy
June 12, 2010 to January 16, 2011
 
 
This special exhibit tells the story of the 1967 Apollo I tragedy when, during routine tests, fire engulfed the command capsule and took the lives of astronauts Virgil “Gus” Grissom, Edward White and Roger Chaffee. Through rare photographs, artifacts and narrative, the exhibit explores this pivotal event, which riveted the attention of a heartbroken nation, set new standards of heroism and service to our country and changed the course of space exploration in America.

The exhibition also explores Intrepid’s role in the U.S. space program through words and photographs, including one of astronaut Scott Carpenter walking past the area that now serves as the Museum’s Special Exhibition Gallery, where “27 Seconds” will be on display.

For more information on programming email educationprograms@intrepidmuseum.org
or call 646-381-5163
 
 
 
Photo courtesy of NASA.
 
Apollo I mission patch.
 
Photo courtesy of NASA.
 
 
Accompanying Grissom (center) would be Senior Pilot Ed White (left), and Pilot Roger B. Chaffee (right).
 
Photo courtesy of NASA.
 
This photo shows the Apollo I command module on a testing stand, prior to the spacecraft being mated to the service module.
 
   
Commonly referred to as the Mercury 7, these were the original American astronauts. Left to Right: Leroy Gordon Cooper; Walter (Wally) Schirra; Alan B. Shepard; Virgil (Gus) Grissom; John Glenn; Donald Kent (Deke) Slayton; Malcolm Scott Carpenter.
 
Senior Pilot –Ed White During his Gemini 4 mission in 1965, astronaut Ed White (b. 1930), became the first astronaut to walk in space.