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Hubble @25
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Hubble @25
October 23, 2014 to January 10, 2016
 
 
HUBBLE@25 commemorated the anniversary of the launch of the Hubble Space Telescope on board the space shuttle Discovery in 1990. Through a rich blend of photographs, Hubble produced images, original artifacts and inspiring immersive environments, the HUBBLE@25 exhibition introduced the public to the history of the telescope and the unparalleled scientific achievements generated by the Hubble project. The exhibition was co-curated by Eric Boehm, Curator of Aviation, and Michael J. Massimino, former NASA astronaut and Senior Advisor, Space Programs at the Intrepid Museum.
 
Mets Home Plate
In 2009 the NY Mets baseball team moved from its original home, Shea Stadium, to their new stadium, Citi Field, in Queens, NY. To commemorate the event, native New Yorker and devoted Mets fan, astronaut Mike Massimino, and his six crewmates, took the plate with them on the last Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission.

United States Flag
Astronauts bring a U.S. flag to space on every mission as a tribute to the nation. This flag, provided by VFW Post 2718 in Franklin Square, NY, was flown on STS-125 in honor of the victims of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks.
Edwin Hubble, the namesake of the amazing Hubble Space Telescope, was a collegiate athlete and played on the University of Chicago basketball team. This ball was used in the tournament of 1909 when Edwin Hubble was an undergraduate student. The ball was flown in space on STS-125, the fifth Hubble Space Telescope Service Mission, by astronaut John Grunsfeld. (Image NASA)
The Faint Object Camera (FOC), the last of the original Hubble instruments, is removed during the fourth servicing Mission in March 2002. (Image NASA)
Engineers inspect Hubble’s 7.87 feet (2.4 m) primary mirror prior to final telescope construction sometime in the late 1980s. (Image NASA)